dog

Photo by Keith Carter: Luna

a single dog
walking alone on a hot sidewalk of
summer
appears to have the power
of ten thousand gods.

why is this?

Charles Bukowski
Love Is a Dog from Hell (1977)

Photo by Keith Carter: Luna

Related: Gods

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a cat is a cat is a cat is a cat

she’s whistling and clapping
for the cats
at 2 a.m.
as I sit here
with my
Beethoven.

“they’re just prowling,” I
tell her…

Beethoven rattles his bones
majestically

and those damn cats
don’t care
about
any of it

and
if they did
I wouldn’t like them
as
well:

things begin to lose their
natural value
when they approach
human
endeavor.

nothing against
Beethoven:
he did fine
for what he
was

but I wouldn’t want
him
on my rug
with one leg
over his head
while
he was
licking
his balls.

Charles Bukowski
You Get So Alone at Times That It Just Makes Sense (1986)

Why We (All of Us) Fight

Photo: "Crazy Earl" (Kieron Jecchinis) in a scene from Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket (1987)

His voice had strengthened. He tipped his chin up, facing these inquisitors. We like, it occurred to me, being challenged. That little adrenal rush washes away a lot of problematics and puts our life on the line, where it wants to be. Better see red than be dead. We like a fight because it shoves aside doubt.

John Updike
Roger’s Version (1986)

Screen capture: “Crazy Earl” (Kieron Jecchinis) in a scene from Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket (1987)

Your True Family

Brothers

The bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other’s life. Rarely do members of one family grow up under the same roof.

Richard Bach
Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah (1977)

The Meow Aria

Because I love cats and I love Mozart. Want to make a world war out of it?

Karoline Pichler, an Austrian writer, tells her readers: ‘One day when I was sitting at the pianoforte playing the “Non piu andrai” from Figaro, Mozart, who was paying a visit to us, came up behind me…sat down, told me to carry on playing the bass, and began to improvise such wonderfully beautiful variations that everyone listened…But then he suddenly tired of it, jumped up, and, in the mad mood which so often came over him, he began to leap over tables and chairs, miaow like a cat, and turn somersaults like an unruly boy.’

Nun liebes Weibchen, ziehst mit mir, KV 625/592a (1790?)
Music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Performed by Eva Lind, soprano; Anton Scharinger, bass; Dresdener Philharmonie, cond. Jörg-Peter Weigle
Complete Mozart Edition Vol. 12: Arias, Vocal Ensembles, Canons, Lieder, Notturni

Text from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: A Biography by Piero Melograni (2006)